Kitchen Pillar

Planning solutions for awkward kitchen spaces (including kitchen pillars)

When it comes to the reality of planning dream kitchens, now and again a structural curveball is thrown in the form of awkwardly shaped kitchen spaces! This might include angled walls, uneven walls, protruding walls, ceiling beams, joists, chimney breasts or kitchen columns and pillars. It might be a subtle kitchen trait that you haven’t ever noticed, or else a very prominent accent  you can’t fail to miss!  Whilst they can be a challenge for kitchen design and layout, it is these same traits that will add character to a home, so rather than a problem or oddity can be transformed into highly appreciable kitchen features.
Key planning for awkward kitchen spaces

Kitchen design with angled ceiling

Room characteristics such as angled kitchen ceilings and structural columns must be accounted for and as early on in the design stage as possible.

An example of such an awkward kitchen trait is kitchen pillars or structural columns. Whilst functional, these also form decorative features that enhance a space, but they need careful planning to avoid looking lost, out of place or else too prominent, and stand out for all the wrong reasons. This highlights the importance of finding an experienced kitchen designer with a keen eye for aesthetics.  Not only that, but to ensure a kitchen company who fully understands how to accurately measure your kitchen space and recognise any awkward dimensions within your plan.  Achieve this and kitchen spaces of all shapes and sizes are usually easy to work with.  To accommodate posts, columns, or projecting walls it may require only minor deviations from standard cabinet sizes to ensure an accurate fit.  This is easily accomplished with bespoke furniture as your kitchen is purposely manufactured to fit the intended space, including any size alterations.  

Without following these steps there is a risk of a kitchen not fitting the space; a stressful and costly error to rectify.

But what if you really don’t like your awkward kitchen trait?

As the saying goes ‘Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder’ so likability of certain room characteristics or awkward kitchen traits is dependent upon their look, but also on people’s personal tastes. Quite simply, not everyone likes the same thing! 

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-wonky-house-lopsided-tudor-canterbury-striking-blue-tilted-street-door-lovely-beautiful-town-image34922032

Beauty is very much in the eye of the beholder so quirky features that work for some are problematic for others!

Moving back to the example of kitchen structural columns it is fair to say these prove most problematic when homeowners simply don’t like or want them there, and/or feel they interfere with a newly intended kitchen design layout.

In such situations, there are generally two options:-

1) A homeowner can seek to remove the kitchen pillar and substitute it with a workable, sound alternative for the structural support it provided.   This option tends to be time-consuming, can be problematic, may sometimes need planning permission, as well as an architect….and is always expensive!

2) The second option is to incorporate the kitchen pillar within the new kitchen layout, blending it as seamlessly and inconspicuously as possible.  This in itself can be challenging, depending on the location and size of both kitchen and column, and ensuring enough space and clear access within the new kitchen. But in an efficient design, structural columns simply won’t draw the eye; They still have to be present but without being the focal point of the room.  Similarly, in a well-effected design, uneven walls or other kitchen peculiarities should be smoothed out so they are no longer awkward, making for an overall kitchen look that flows well, whilst stylish and elegant.  

Awkward kitchen Design Examples…

…Our kitchen design team have years of experience in working with awkward kitchen spaces, and are well-skilled in transforming such spaces into attractive and functional kitchen designs.  This includes designing for both wanted and unwanted kitchen columns! Here are some kitchen design examples showing where and how they have achieved this:

Cashmere gloss kitchen with freestanding structural pillar

Imagine the space without the kitchen and you will see why this structural column was proving a headache for the owners of this space. The obvious choice for this extremely prominent kitchen pillar of h2540mm x w1100mm x d486mm was to create an island that exacted the dimensions and blend it into the space, whilst allowing a clear walkway all away around both the column and kitchen island. The depth of the island base units was 600mm, with a radiator in the centre and bespoke radiator cover on the other side, which was measured and exacted to fill the remaining void. An oven (not visible in the photo) was positioned centrally between the large pillar and the smaller one opposite for an overall balanced effect.

Imagine the space without the kitchen and you will see why this awkward kitchen pillar was proving a headache for the owners of this space. The obvious choice for this extremely prominent kitchen pillar of h2540mm x w1100mm x d486mm was to create an island that exacted the dimensions and blend it into the space, whilst allowing a clear walkway all away around both the column and kitchen island. The depth of the island base units was 600mm, with a radiator in the centre and bespoke radiator cover on the other side, which was measured and exacted to fill the remaining void. An oven (not visible in the photo) was positioned centrally between the large pillar and the smaller one opposite for an overall balanced effect.

 

 Terra Oak and Basalt Grey Kitchen Design with central pillar feature

http://www.lwk-home.com/recent-installations/st-albans-01-kitchen-installation.php

Part of a major home remodelling project this brand new open plan kitchen extension included a structural column with brickwork feature, intended to stand out from the rest of the design, as it does so against the dark Terra Oak cabinets. The pillar also serves to hide the smaller kitchen appliances from plain view, so from the lounge room or garden, they do not interrupt the clean lines of the kitchen.

 

 Blackberry design glass and white satin lacquer kitchen with central kitchen pillar

Blackberry kitchen design with pillar

This kitchen brief specified that the central pillar blend within the design to make it less conspicuous. This was achieved by cutting a small notch within the pillar, and into which a corner of the worktop was inserted. This effectively unified the pillar and worktop, ensuring a sleek and seamless finish, whilst still allowing the desired worktop overhang, and a social seating arrangement where no person’s view is obscured by the pillar.

 

Light grey matt kitchen with x 3 structural kitchen columns

Kitchen pillars

These structural kitchen columns have been converted into a central feature of the kitchen. Not one, but three kitchen pillars had to be accommodated within this design; two on either side of the cooker (but not identical in size) and one further kitchen pillar behind the kitchen peninsula. The latter was altered to fit by reducing the depth of the sliding glass door units; the base unit to the right of the cooker had its depth reduced from 560mm to 425mm deep, and the base unit to the left had its depth reduced to 400mm deep. Generous kitchen storage was provided by installing tall units neatly into the space on the opposing side of the kitchen.

 

  Cashmere and white matt kitchen design with prominent structural pillar

Kitchen pillar design

Dummy drawers were fitted on one side of this kitchen island to allow for the very large structural kitchen pillar, yet there was still sufficient space on the other side for a base unit with x2 pan drawers and an interior pull out drawer, as well as room to navigate around the pillar and island.

 

 Beige grey satin lacquer kitchen with structural post to left hand side

Kitchen Pillar planning

The kitchen pillar running from floor to ceiling on the left hand side of the room was accommodated within the design by cutting out the back of the base unit and reducing the width of the 90cm wide wall unit to the right of the pillar, ensuring it could fit neatly within the space.

 

LWK Kitchens have lots of experience in working with awkward spaces in kitchen design so please Contact Us for any help, advice or ideas.

 

Here’s some further posts you might find helpful:

 

 

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